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3 free rabies vaccination clinics being held next month in Chautauqua County

Animals must be pre-registered to get a vaccination at one of the clinics. Walk-ins will not be accepted.
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Vet examining dog and cat. Puppy and kitten at veterinarian doctor. Animal clinic. Pet check up and vaccination. Health care for dogs and cats.

CHAUTAUQUA COUNTY, N.Y. — The Chautauqua County Department of Health and Human Services is holding three free drive-in rabies vaccination clinics in September.

The first vaccine clinic is happening on September 9 from 5 p.m. to 7 p.m. at the Town of Carroll Town Hall located at 5 W. Main Street in Frewsburg. Click here to pre-register.

The second vaccine clinic is happening on September 10 from noon to 2 p.m. at the Town of Poland Highway Department located at 533 Grubb Hill Road in Kennedy. Click here to pre-register. 

The third vaccine clinic is happening on September 25 from 10 a.m. to noon at the Sinclairville Volunteer Fire Station located at 30 Main Street in Sinclairville. Click here to pre-register. 

Animals must be pre-registered to get a vaccination at one of the clinics. Walk-ins will not be accepted. There are a limited number of spots available, so pet owners should register as soon as possible.

Vaccinations will be provided free of charge for all dogs, cats, and domesticated ferrets, three months of age and older. New York State public health law requires dogs, cats, and ferrets over the age of four months be vaccinated against rabies.

All dogs must be on a leash (small dogs may be in a carrier).  All cats must be in a carrier. Owners are asked to remain in their vehicles with their pets, and to wear a facemask. Animal handlers will transport animals from the vehicle to the veterinarian for vaccination.

Be sure to bring previous rabies vaccination records for each animal that will be receiving a shot to ensure proper and effective vaccination.

Raccoons, bats, skunks, and foxes are common rabies carriers. The virus is transmitted to humans and animals through saliva, and it can enter the body from a bite, scratch, scrape or open cut. 

Rabies infects the central nervous system and can cause brain swelling and even death within days of the onset of symptoms.