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BUFFALO, N.Y. - New York Attorney General Eric Schneiderman says there are no easy answers or quick fixes when it comes to getting control of ever-rising gas prices.

Last April, Schneiderman was named to a federal task force to look into high gas prices and to see whether the oil and gas industry was breaking any laws.

ScottBrown: "Have you found any abuses by the gas companies?"

A.G. Schneiderman: "We found some problems in New York and my office did bring some price gouging cases in the context of local emergencies having to do with hurricanes and other things. The broader federal task force has not come to a conclusion yet and I'm urging them to do so."

Schneiderman says the federal group could issue a report within the next few weeks.

Scott Brown: "Whatever comes out of the task force, what is it going to mean to Joe Smith when he puts his credit card into the pump?"

A.G. Schneiderman: "It has to mean that prices stabilize and stop shooting up."

Scott Brown: "Any specifics you can predict are going to come out of this?"

A.G. Schneiderman: "I think it will relate to global supply issues, negotiations with OPEC, issues on speculation on what's happening in the emerging economies, also what's happening with possible threats of war, I think it will have to do with the Strategic Petroleum Reserve and with other plans to open up other potential sources of energy within the U.S."

When the task force was formed last April, gas in Western New York was $3.98 a gallon.

One month ago it was $3.72, and this week it's right back to where it was last April at $3.98.

Scott Brown: "Just in Western New York, prices are up by more than 25 cents a gallon over the last month, what do you tell people?"

A.G. Schneiderman: "You tell people it's unacceptable and there's not much we can do at the state level, that we should be urging our federal colleagues and counterparts to take action."

Scott Brown: "People hear about studies by the Federal Trade Commission and your group, and yet prices go up and people say what's going on?"

A.G. Schneiderman: "It's unacceptable and it requires us to have a long term energy plan in this country and the president has been trying to move forward on several fronts on energy policies that have not been able to move through congress."