The ancient Egyptians practiced intentional mummification, but mummies can also be preserved naturally. Hot, dry or cool, dry places with constant air flow can preserve bodies.

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BUFFALO, N.Y. - A never-before-seen collection of mummies from all over the world is now on display at the Buffalo Museum of Science.

"Mummies of the World" features 40 human and animal mummies from Europe, South America, and Egypt.

More than a dozen institutions loaned mummies and artifacts for the traveling exhibition which is at the museum for a limited time.

Mummies aren't just bandaged-wrapped bodies from ancient Egypt like many people think. Many of the bodies on display were naturally preserved in crypts or bogs where the conditions were just right.

Mummies not only allow us to learn about the past and how people lived but give a glimpse into the future, especially when it comes to medicine.

"In some cases we're able to look at tuberculosis and see how it has changed from say 18th century Hungary to the modern day. In looking at that we see these modern forms of TB, and maybe we can start to find some treatments for it as well," said Dr. Heather Gill-Frerking, director of science and education.

Click here to buy tickets to "Mummies of the World" at the Buffalo Museum of Science.

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