A group tasked with developing recommendations to improve implementation of a controversial set of learning standards known as Common Core, issued a report to the NYS Board of Regents Monday morning.

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ALBANY, NY – A group of state regents, tasked with developing recommendations to improve implementation of a controversial set of learning standards known as Common Core, issued a report to the NYS Board of Regents Monday morning.

The State Board of Regents P-12 Education and Higher Education Committees adopted several measures presented by the work group to adjust the implementation of the new Common Core Standards.

The State Education Department, in a news release, said the full Board is expected to act on the Committee reports on Wednesday. However, regent Bob Bennett of Buffalo told WGRZ-TV that will be a mere formality and for all intents and purposes, the changes have been adopted.

However, within hours of the announced changes, Gov. Andrew Cuomo issued a scathing comment.

"Today's recommendations are another in a series of missteps by the Board of Regents that suggests the time has come to seriously reexamine its capacity and performance.," Cuomo said in a statement. "These recommendations are simply too little, too late for our parents and students.

"Common Core is the right goal and direction as it is vital that we have a real set of standards for our students and a meaningful teacher evaluation system. However, Common Core's implementation in New York has been flawed and mismanaged from the start.

"As far as today's recommendations are concerned, there is a difference between remedying the system for students and parents and using this situation as yet another excuse to stop the teacher evaluation process.

"The Regents' response is to recommend delaying the teacher evaluation system and is yet another in a long series of roadblocks to a much needed evaluation system which the Regents had stalled putting in place for years.

WEB EXTRA: READ THE REPORT HERE

Among the recommendations:

- That teachers and principals would be able to fight low evaluation scores on the grounds that their districts didn't properly implement the Common Core standards

- Delaying when students would be held accountable to the harder tests, by five years, so that the class of 2022 would be the first students required to pass Common Core aligned exams in order to graduate.

Education Commissioner John King also said that the state will delay sending identifiable student data -- with names and addresses -- to third-party vendors like inBloom until officials can work out privacy concerns with legislators.

In all, the 6-member panel, formed in December after some contentious public hearings held throughout the state on Common Core, made 19 recommendations.

Several Regents, including Chancellor Merryl Tisch, said the 19 changes represent a genuine attempt to address the many concerns expressed by parents and educators about the implementation of the state's reforms.

"The urgency of our work led to unevenness of implantation across the state," said Regent Wade Norwood, who chaired the committee.

A separate motion to freeze Common Core-based testing for grades 3-8 was defeated..

The Regents also recommended:

· To tell school districts that if they use standardized tests to determine student placements, students should not be penalized because of the transition to the Common Core.

· To seek a federal waiver so that newly arrived English-language learners can take a language-acquisition test rather than the Common Core-based ELA test.

· To clarify that students who get a "2" on a state test need extra help but should not be considered to have failed.

· Give districts flexibility to reduce testing time for teacher evaluations.

· Develop new curricular materials to help students with disabilities and those with limited English.

· To ask the National Governors Association, which spurred creation of the Common Core, to establish a system to review and update the standards.

Regent Charles Bendit wondered if many of today's students will get short-changed if they don't have to meet tougher targets on Regents exams.

"What happens to the students between now and then?" he said.

King said students will still be working toward the Common Core standards, with their emphasis on reading non-fiction, understanding mathematical concepts and more. The change, he said, would delay the raising of passing scores that indicate "college and career readiness."

STATEMENT FROM GOVERNOR CUOMO

"Today's recommendations are another in a series of missteps by the Board of Regents that suggests the time has come to seriously reexamine its capacity and performance. These recommendations are simply too little, too late for our parents and students.

"Common Core is the right goal and direction as it is vital that we have a real set of standards for our students and a meaningful teacher evaluation system. However, Common Core's implementation in New York has been flawed and mismanaged from the start.

"As far as today's recommendations are concerned, there is a difference between remedying the system for students and parents and using this situation as yet another excuse to stop the teacher evaluation process.

"The Regents' response is to recommend delaying the teacher evaluation system and is yet another in a long series of roadblocks to a much needed evaluation system which the Regents had stalled putting in place for years.

"I have created a commission to thoroughly examine how we can address these issues. The commission has started its work and we should await their recommendations so that we can find a legislative solution this session to solve these problems."

This story includes reporting by Joseph Spector, Chief of the Gannett Albany Bureau.

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