LIVE VIDEO: Channel 2 News at 4:30am    Watch
 

Officials: US wars against Muslims Fueled Suspects in Boston Bombings

10:49 PM, Apr 24, 2013   |    comments
  • Share
  • Print
  • - A A A +
  • FILED UNDER

WASHINGTON (AP) - U.S. officials say the surviving suspect in last week's attack on the Boston Marathon has told investigators he and his brother were angry about U.S. wars in Muslim countries.

Two officials said that Dzhokhar Tsarnaev  acknowledged the anti-U.S. motive while being questioned by investigators last weekend.

One official on Wednesday said Tsarnaev cited the U.S.-led invasions of Iraq and Afghanistan as the motive for the Boston attack. The official was briefed on the investigation by the FBI.

The other official is close to the investigation. Both officials demanded anonymity to talk about the ongoing probe.

Neighbors have described Dzhokhar's older brother, Tamerlan, as visibly angry about the wars in Afghanistan and Iraq.

Tamerlan was killed in a shootout with police last Friday.

The area near the Boston Marathon finish line is reopening to the general public.

Traffic was allowed to flow all the way down Boylston Street on Wednesday morning for the first time since two explosions on April 15 killed three spectators and sent more than 260 to the hospital.

Delivery trucks made their way down the street under a heavy police presence.

Workers at some businesses and hotels in the area were allowed to return to their jobs on Tuesday to prepare for reopening.

Some stores directly affected by the blasts are still boarded up.

The Copley subway station that had been closed since the bombings also reopened, while the main branch of the Boston Public Library was also scheduled to reopen Wednesday.

Meanwhile,  lawmakers are asking tough questions about how the government tracked suspected Boston Marathon bomber Tamerlan Tsarnaev when he traveled to Russia last year, renewing criticism from after the Sept. 11 attacks that failure to share intelligence may have contributed to last week's deadly assault.

Following a closed-door briefing on Capitol Hill with the FBI and other law enforcement officials on Tuesday, Sen. Saxby Chambliss, R-Ga., vice chairman of the Senate Intelligence Committee, said it doesn't appear yet that anyone "dropped the ball." But he said he was asking all the federal agencies for more information about who knew what about the suspect.

"There still seem to be serious problems with sharing information, including critical investigative information ... not only among agencies but also within the same agency in one case," said committee member Sen. Susan Collins, R-Maine.

Lawmakers intensified their scrutiny as funerals were held Tuesday for an 8-year-old boy killed in the bombings and a campus police officer who authorities said was shot by Tsarnaev and his younger brother days later. A memorial service for the officer, 26-year-old Sean Collier, is scheduled for Wednesday. Vice President Joe Biden is expected to speak.

Most Watched Videos