National Preservation Conference Underway

9:03 PM, Oct 20, 2011   |    comments
  • Share
  • Print
  • - A A A +
  • FILED UNDER
  • Tourists board busses to begin the tours.
    

BUFFALO, NY -Two thousand movers and shakers from the historic preservation world have already started to arrive in Buffalo for this week's National Trust for Historic Preservation Conference.

It will highlight some of Buffalo's cultural tourism, everything from museums and architecture to historic sites. The events are ticketed and for most of them you need to be part of the conference to get in.

 But there's a way you can take part in some of it as well.

"They're really here to look at Buffalo as a living laboratory of preservation," said Ed Healy, of Visit Buffalo Niagara.

Residents can join the preservationists on some of their stops without needing a ticket.

"The opening plenary, which is on Wednesday afternoon from four to six, will be at Sheas and will be open to the public," said Healy.

The talk will feature an update on the state of preservation in the U.S. and what projects the National Trust is working on.

At 5:30pm on Thursday, Kleinhans Music Hall will be the backdrop for the preservation awards ceremony. The top historic sites from around the country will be honored. That too is free.

"We're hoping that a Buffalo project or two will be recognized at the national preservation awards this year," said Healy. "We're not sure yet but we're hoping! We got our fingers crossed."

Another event that is open to the public, but does require you to purchase a ticket, is called Museums by Moonlight. It's scheduled for Thursday night.

"The Albright Knox, the Burchfield Penney, the Richardson Towers are going to be open to the public that night as well," said Healy.

There are also two free art galleries at the Market arcade featuring art focusing on Buffalo and its trademark buildings and landscapes. The aim of the C.E.P.A. gallery's exhibit highlights the history of grain elevators in the Queen City.

Even though the conference is focusing on the people coming in to town for the event, organizers wanted to make sure the people who live here can also explore the history and culture in Buffalo and to recognize what we have and live among every day.

"This is an opportunity to raise awareness about preservation," said Healy. "Preservation is an economic development tool. It's a tool that communities can use to help save and interpret their history."

The preservation conference officially kicks off Wednesday and wraps up Saturday with an event at the Statler, which is currently being preserved itself.

"They're really here to look at Buffalo as a living laboratory of preservation," said Ed Healy, of Visit Buffalo Niagara.   

Residents can join the preservationists on some of their stops without needing a ticket.

"The opening plenary, which is in on Wednesday afternoon from four to six, will be at Sheas and will be open to the public," said Healy.

The talk will feature an update on the state of preservation in the U.S. and what projects the National Trust is working on.

At 5:30pm on Thursday, Kleinhans Music Hall will be the backdrop for the preservation awards ceremony. The top historic sites from around the country will be honored. That too is free.

"We're hoping that a Buffalo project or two will be recognized at the national preservation awards this year," said Healy. "We're not sure yet but we're hoping! We got our fingers crossed."

Late Thursday, there will be a candlelight tour through some of Buffalo's old mansions on Lincoln Parkway.

"I think there are sixteen houses participating this year," said Healy. "The sidewalks are going to be lit up by torches. It's just going to have a real atmosphere."

That event is open to the public but it does require you to purchase a ticket.

So does what's called the Museums by Moonlight event which is also scheduled for Thursday night.

"The Albright Knox, the Burchfield Penney, the Richardson Towers are going to be open to the public that night as well," said Healy.

There are also two free art galleries at the Market Arcade featuring art focusing on Buffalo and its trademark buildings and landscapes. The aim of the C.E.P.A. gallery's exhibit highlights the history of grain elevators in the Queen City. 

Even though the conference is focusing on the people coming in to town for the event, organizers wanted to make sure the people who live here can also explore the history and culture in Buffalo and to recognize what we have and live among every day. 

"This is an opportunity to raise awareness about preservation," said Healy. "Preservation is an economic development tool. It's a tool that communities can use to help save and interpret their history."

The preservation conference officially kicks off Wednesday and wraps up Saturday with an event at the Statler, which is currently being preserved itself.

Click here for the complete list of events for the conference including those which are open to the public.

Most Watched Videos