ALBANY -- Hillary Clinton maintained a comfortable lead in New York in advance of Tuesday's presidential election, but rival Donald Trump narrowed the gap, a Siena College poll released Sunday said.

The two New Yorkers have talked about winning their home state, and Clinton has held considerable leads in polls. The Siena poll Sunday showed Clinton with a 17 percentage-point lead in New York, down from 24 percentage points last month.

In the other statewide race on the New York ballot Tuesday, Democratic Sen. Charles Schumer led by 42 percentage points over Republican Wendy Long, 67 percent to 25 percent, Siena said.

The two races will be at the top of a New York ballot that also includes races for Congress and the state Legislature.

Democrats outnumber Republicans by a two-to-one margin, and New York has not been considered one of the battleground states.

And it's her support with Democrats that has kept her in front in New York, said Siena poll spokesman Steven Greenberg. She was winning 78 percent of the vote with Democrats, while Trump was winning 71 percent with Republicans, the poll said. Clinton was leading in heavily blue New York City, where both candidates will be Election Night, while she was winning 42 percent to 37 percent in upstate.

In the battleground New York City suburbs, they were tied with 45 percent each, the poll said.

“As a result of her continued strong performance with Democrats, Clinton carries a solid double digit lead into the final days of the 2016 campaign," Greenberg said in a statement. "Trump picked up ground, pulling even with Clinton with independents and in the downstate suburbs.”

Republicans are hoping Trump can help the ticket retain control of the state Senate and win congressional seats.

Greenberg said Clinton's lead with men fell from 16 percentage points three weeks ago to five percentage points in the latest poll.

Yet the Chappaqua resident held a 28 percentage-point lead with women, and an overwhelming lead with minority voters in New York.

Overall, Clinton’s favorability rating was 49 percent to 47 percent, while the Manhattan developer's favorability was 34 percent positive and 63 percent negative.

The Siena College poll was conducted Nov. 3-4 to 617 likely New York voters. It had a margin of error of 4.5 percentage points.